All Paintings

Philippa Mary Faulkner
Canadian, 1917-2001
Abstract Composition
Oil on board
30 ½ by 24 ½ in. W/frame 38 by 32 in.

Inventory Number: Art F463
Details
William Nichols
American,  Born 1942
Flowering Garden
Oil on canvas
Flowering Garden

Inventory Number: Art N47
Details
Tadashi Asoma
Japanese, B.1923
Bloom Along the Boughs
Oil on canvas
50 by 60 in. W/frame 51 by 61 in.

Inventory Number: Art A215
Details
Gabriel Godard
French, Born 1933
Paysage au Bord de la Riviere
Oil on canvas
39 ½ by 39 ½ in.

Inventory Number: Art G240
Details
Charles Levier
French, 1920-2004
A Vase of Flowers
Oil on canvas
40 by 30 in. w/frame 48 by 38 in.

Inventory Number: Art L42
Details
Sam Kaner
American, 1924-1990
Abstract
Oil on canvas
32 by 48 in. W/frame 33 by 49 in.

Inventory Number: Art K51
Details
Huib Van Vugt
Dutch, 1923-2008
Green Apples
Oil on canvas
31 by 39 in. W/frame 33 by 41 in.

Inventory Number: Art V60
Details
Frédéric François Menguy
French,1927-2007
Apres le Bain
Oil on canvas
25-1/2" x 36-1/4" Frame measures 32" x 42-1/2"

Inventory Number: Art M87
Details
Jean Dufy
French, 1888-1964
L’Oree du Bois
Oil on canvas
31 ¾ in. by 25 1/2 in., W/frame 43 in. by 37 in.

Literature: Bailly, Jacques. Catalogue Raisonne of Jean Dufy's Work, vol. 2. Paris: Editions Jacques Bailly, 2010, p. 164, no. B 922.



Inventory Number: Art D265
Details
Jean Dufy
French, 1888-1964
Voiliers
Oil on canvas
16 x 9.50 ins / 40.75 x 24.25 cm

Voiliersis an incredibly expressive nautical scene by Jean Dufy who was known for his depictions of leisurely social activities of the French bourgeoisie. Dufy was strongly influenced by the musical figures that surrounded him, especially in Paris. The expressiveness of Voiliers, recalls the music that Dufy would have heard in the cafés of Paris- a culture Dufy was very much a part of. The strong vertical brushstrokes in Voiliersconveys the sense of movement associated with jazz and also recalls the fluid motion of waves. The title itself, ‘Voiliers’refers to the specific type of boats depicted in this painting; the name of which is derived for the French word for sail or veil. The boats were previously mercantile ships but during Dufy’s lifestyle they were used as leisure boats, as seen by the graphic figures in the foreground.

Literature:
Accompanied by a certificate from Jacques Bailly (December, 2007);

Jean-Jacques Bailly has included this painting in his Volume II of the Jean Dufy catalogue raisonné, 2010 



Inventory Number: Art D266
Details
Jean Beraud
French, 1849-1935
Une Parisienne
Oil on canvas
21.9 x 15.2 ins / 55.5 x 38.5 cms

Une Parisienne is a prime example of Béraud’s work; a vivid, elegant portrait of a Parisian society lady from the Belle Époque. His use of browns, greys and blacks make the smiling subject seem alive, as if the sitter were about to step out of the painting to meet the viewer. Béraud has purposefully chosen to paint the woman against a plain backdrop to show the finery of her attire such as the velvet of her jacket and the chiffon of her collar and cuffs. This colour combination recalls the more formal training that Béraud undertook however the bold, firm brushstrokes create a bridge between traditional genre paintings and those of the Impressionists, who were only just emerging when Béraud was painting.

Jean Béraud was an important French painter who was most famed for his paintings of Parisian life during the Belle Époque. During this pre-war period of peace and prosperity Beraud was highly regarded in Parisian society, initially due to the numerous genre paintings he produced.

Béraud was born in St. Petersburg and initially trained in law before the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian was in 1870 and the occupation of Paris.

When Béraud began his artistic career he exhibited his works at the Salon, doing so for the first time in 1872 when he was a student of Léon Bonnat. However, his work did not gain serious recognition until 1876, when he produced a genre painting entitled, ‘On the Way Back from the Funeral’.

Notably, this was after the first exhibition of the Impressionists at the Salon des Indépendants in 1874 and as a result, his work is somewhere in the midst of the impressionistic scenes of everyday life and the more academic art of the salon.

Much of his work would contain some sort of mockery of Parisian life at the turn of the century.

Béraud was a very popular artist during his lifetime, however his work was completely ignored by art historians of the period.

Literature:

‘Jean Béraud 1849- 1935- The Belle Époque: A Dream of Times Gone By’ catalogue raisonné by Patrick Offenstadt; Page 290, Illustration no. 397



Inventory Number: Art B210
Details
Pierre Auguste Renoir
French, 1841-1919
Port de La Rochelle
Oil on canvas
8.1 x 12.7 ins/ 20.7 x 32.3 cms

The Old Port of La Rochelle, present day:

It is likely that Renoir stood nearer the tower on this side to paint Port de La Rochelle, 1896.

It is a testament to the great quality of this work that it remained in the family when, after the death of the artist, the painting was passed on to his second son, Jean Renoir, who himself was famous for his work as a director and for his profound influence on French cinema between 1930 and 1950. Renoir’s smaller works tend to be unfinished and sketchier but this painting is more of a finished piece with warmer colours and looser brushwork, techniques he adopted in the 1890s.

Of all the Impressionist artists, Renoir demonstrated sensitivity beyond the loose brushwork of his contemporaries. His works play with very vibrant light and intimate subjects. He often painted contemporary Parisian life but his most touching renditions include portraits and studies of the female nude.

Though born in Limoges, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was raised in Paris. He seems to have had inkling to the more sensitive sides of life; he soon started working as an apprentice to a porcelain factory and decorating fans. Renoir’s great influences early in his career were French 18th Century Rococo artists including Antoine Watteau, François Boucher, and Jean-Honoré Fragonard, whose works hung in the Louvre and have often been translated for porcelain, furniture, and other decorative items.

Although he started drawing mainly for the decorative arts, in 1862, Renoir decided to take painting more seriously: he entered the Atelier Gleyre, where he met important contemporaries such as Monet, Sisley and Bazille.

In the 1860s Renoir struggled to get into the Salon, and he struggled both financially and emotionally. In 1869, the Salon accepted his painting ‘Lise.’ Renoir continued his studies under some of the greatest masters of the 19th century in Paris: Courbet, Manet, Corot, and Delacroix. One could almost say that Renoir and his friend Claude Monet were at the centre of the movement after 1869. They painted together at a popular bathing spot on the Seine called La Grenouillère. The water, movement, light and energy inspired the two artists to become obsessed with the immediacy of light and shadow in their immediate surroundings. Indeed, they were capturing ‘impressions’ of contemporary Parisian life. The paintings from La Genouillère show two perspectives of the same epiphany and are a unique glance into the roots of what would become “Impressionism” in the following decades. Indeed, at the time, the styles of the Renoir and Monet were virtually identical save their sitting in different spots.

By 1874, Renoir, Pissarro, Monet, Cézanne, Sisley, Berthe Morisot, Degas, and other artists registered themselves as a joint stock company and decided to exhibit independently of the Salon on the boulevard des Capucines. Missing was Manet, who preferred to keep showing at the Salon.

These exhibitions received widespread critique, but several commissions arose from people who believed in the young artists’ inventions. Renoir completed various commissioned portraits during this time, full of soft light, a testament to a radiant happiness in life. One aspect of colour that fascinated the Impressionists, and especially Renoir, was the influence of one shade upon another - especially the skin tones rendered by this artist show tinges of greens, blues, greys, or reds depending on the surrounding environment.

Renoir then visited Italy where the structured and rational art of Raphael inspired him, and his subsequent paintings reverted back to a tight, classical style which was considered his least successful. By the last decade of the 19th century, Renoir had returned to form; he infused sensuality, passion and joy into his works. Unfortunately, Renoir’s maturity was marred by ill health. He broke his right arm in 1897, this brought on arthritis which began to seriously affect him and restrict his painting. Furthermore, his eyesight worsened as he had partial atrophy of the nerve in his left eye, rheumatism caused him great pain. By 1910, he was in a wheelchair and his grossly deformed hands had to be bound with bandages to retrieve the chafing from attempting to hold a paintbrush.

To relieve himself from the pain he moved to a mild, dry climate in Cagnes, situated in the south of France. He built a house and studio by an olive grove at Les Collettes in 1907 and by 1908 his family moved there. He spent winters in Cagnes, and summers in Essoyes, with intermittent trips to Paris, to keep in touch with friends, exhibitions and museums.

This involvement with the Parisian art scene can be evidenced as artists like Rodin and Matisse visited him at his home in Cagnes. In 1913 the renowned dealer Ambroise Vollard suggested the painter attempt the art of sculpture, with the help of Guino, a pupil of Maillol’s. Though these sculptures were successful, in 1910 Renoir had written to his protégé Albert André that “painting is a happy occupation since it is capable of maintaining our illusions and bringing us joy.” In great pain, Renoir still completed a large scale composition entitled “Rest after a Bath” and a still life of apples in the last year of his life. 



Inventory Number: Art P93
Details
Henri Léon Mabboux
French, 1843-1895
Le Degustation de Moules
Oil on canvas
66 by 48 in. W/frame 78 by 60 in.

Inventory Number: Ar M352
Details
18th Century French School Venus & Adonis
Oil on copper
13 by 11 in. W/frame 15 by 13 in.

Inventory Number: Art IT9
Details
An 18th Century French School Diana & Endymion
Oil on copper
13 by 11 in. W/frame 15 by 13 in.

Inventory Number: Art IT8
Details
Germaine Verna
French, 1900-1975
Horserace at St. Moritz
Oil on canvas
21 ½ by 29 in. W/frame 28 ½ by 36 in.

Inventory Number: Art V20
Details
Germaine Verna
French, 1900-1975
Le Jardin Des Tuileries
Oil on canvas
20 by 26 in. W/frame 27 by 33 in.

Inventory Number: Art V18
Details
Germaine Verna
French, 1900-1975
Marina D’Aszona
Oil on canvas
20 by 25 ½ in. W/frame 27 by 32 ½ in.

Inventory Number: Art V17
Details
Germaine Verna
French, 1900-1975
Ascona Harbor
Oil on canvas
21 ½ by 29 in. W/frame 28 ½ by 36 in.

Inventory Number: Art V14
Details
Peter Van De Velde
Flemish, 1634-1687
A Mediterranean Scene with Ships
Oil on canvas
28 by 34 in. w/frame 36 by 44 in.

Inventory Number: Art V6
Details
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